Working Nights

A resource for improving the health and safety of shift workers since 1983

The Impact of Ageing on Sleep

It seems like every day we learn more about the importance of a full night of beneficial and restorative sleep; we understand that it impacts every portion of our lives and without it, we are vulnerable to a myriad of diseases and chronic conditions. Yet, for many of us and for many reasons, that type of sleep is so very difficult to come by.

Unfortunately, as we age it becomes even harder. Older adults face a reduction in the quantity and quality of deep sleep, the stage that beneficially overhauls our cardiovascular, immune and metabolic systems and refreshes learning and memory abilities. Beginning in our 30s, each decade represents a significant decline in the restorative deep sleep we experienced when young.

In addition, our sleep also becomes more fragmented; we wake up more during the night, perhaps because of a weakened bladder or aches and pains.

Scientists also have determined that the circadian rhythms (the body’s internal wake/sleep clock) of older people change, resulting in our bodies calling for earlier bedtimes and earlier risings which can disrupt our sleep cycles.

Ageing in general can cause a deterioration in our health, but we are learning that the deterioration of our sleep may be more in play than we previously thought. As we age, we should continue to pay attention to our sleep patterns and discuss them with our doctors. There are steps that can and should be taken to improve and maintain a better night’s sleep….learn about them

Posted 11 months, 1 week ago at 1:12 pm.

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Drowsy Driving

A new report issued earlier this month by the Governors Highway Safety Association identifies drowsy driving as the factor in crashes that claimed 5,000 lives in 2015. It is estimated to cause 20 percent of all traffic deaths which increased by 8 percent last year. The annual cost of fatigue related accidents that cause injury or death is $109 billion, not including property damage!

Because nearly 84 million sleep deprived Americans are on the road each day, the National Highway Traffic Safety Association (NHTSA) has expanded its definition of impaired driving to include drowsy driving, in addition to drunk, drugged and distracted driving. The drivers who are at greater risk of driving while tired are teens and young adults, shift workers and those with sleep disorders. Too little sleep causes drivers to react more slowly, resulting in injuries and death.

The report recommends Americans change their view of sleep; it should be considered an essential element of a healthy life, along with eating right and exercising.

Posted 2 years ago at 9:59 am.

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Help for Insomnia

Chronic insomnia is defined as at least three restless nights per week for at least three months. Have you been experiencing this? If yes, you are not alone!  The American College of Physicians (ACP) reports that 6-10 percent of people in the United States have insomnia; this percentage may be even greater among the shift work population.

Often figuring out what to do about it causes even more sleeplessness. A new report issued by the ACP suggests that cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) might be worth a try. The physicians acknowledge that, while it may not have better results than sleep medications, it does have far fewer side effects.

Learn more about CBT and how it may work for you at the Huffington Post…..

Posted 2 years, 4 months ago at 10:23 am.

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New CDC Sleep Study

 

At Working Nights we often discuss the importance of sleep and the obstacles shift workers face in trying to get enough of it. Lack of sleep is not only a major issue for shift workers but for many adults (and unfortunately, a growing number of children) in the world. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that, according to a new sleep study, more than one third of adults in America are not getting enough sleep on a regular basis. This study is the first to document estimates of self-reported healthy sleep duration (identified as 7 hours or more) in all 50 states and Washington, D.C.

To learn more about the study and about some steps you can take to increase the quantity and quality of your sleep, go to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website.

Posted 2 years, 7 months ago at 9:46 am.

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The Effects of Interrupted Sleep

Ask yourself how often you get a full uninterrupted night’s sleep… do you ever? If your answer is sometimes, rarely or never, you are not alone!

We now know that sleep impacts EVERY part of our mental, physical and emotional lives and that it is the number one ingredient for optimum health. Knowing that, we usually worry about the number of hours of sleep we get and do not as often consider the quality of those hours. A recent study suggests we should….read about the impact of disrupted sleep at (e) Science News.

Posted 2 years, 9 months ago at 1:44 pm.

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Sleep…the Key to Staying Healthy This Winter!

Sleep is a subject being studied by researchers more than ever as they continue to learn how it impacts every part of our mental, physical and emotional lives. Working Nights discusses it often since shift workers, due to their unique hours and the disruption of their circadian rhythms, get less sleep than the day working population.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) call insufficient sleep a public health epidemic. The National Sleep Foundation reported in their 2013 survey that one in five Americans get less than six hours of sleep on an average work night.

As we approach winter and cold and flu season, we need to try even harder to get more undisturbed quality sleep (we are turning the clocks back this Sunday, November 1st, so there is an extra hour!). Working Nights looked at the results of a new UC San Francisco study on the relationship between shortened sleep and catching a cold or virus. Those results show  that those who slept less than six hours a night were 4.2 times more likely to catch a cold; the odds increased for those who slept even less!

Learn more about the study and its results at (e)Science News.

Posted 2 years, 10 months ago at 3:38 pm.

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Are You Sitting Too Much?

In recent years there have been numerous articles written about the physical toll of being sedentary. Excessive sitting is associated with 34 chronic diseases and conditions! Studies show that sitting too much has been linked to cardiovascular events like heart attack, heart disease death, overall death and death from cancer. It has also been associated with high blood pressure, obesity, bad cholesterol and too much belly fat.

Dr. David Alter, the senior scientist of a new study on sitting at the University Health Network (UHN) in Toronto said, “More than one-half of an average person’s days is spent being sedentary — sitting, watching television or working at a computer.” Studies have reported that people who sit for long periods were 24 percent more likely to die from health problems during the studies, which lasted between 1 and 16 years, compared to those who sat less.

And now the results of a new study in Australia indicate there is yet one more reason to get up from your chair….in addition to the physical impacts, there is evidence that there is a link between too much sitting and emotional stress; that is the more sedentary a person was, the more likely he or she was to feel anxious. Only nine studies have so far examined this link, so additional research is needed.

However, ultimately, the bottom line is sitting for a long period of time is bad for you, even if you are active and exercise regularly. Knowing this, make a point of getting up every hour or so….grab a drink, walk over to a co-worker’s desk, choose to stand more when you have a choice…it is worth it!

Posted 3 years, 1 month ago at 10:18 am.

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No More Excuses!

Most of us know the importance of exercise, but still come up with excuses not to do any.  It may be too hot, too cold, too wet or too snowy. You may be too tired, too busy or too stressed. It is not easy to start an exercise regimen; it is even more difficult when working evenings or nights. Yet, the benefits of exercise so outweigh any excuse we may come up with that it is worth a second look and try.

This week WebMD details the 12 Rewards of Exercise. All of the benefits discussed can only make our lives better; how would you like to get a better night’s sleep, have more energy, be more productive and be less stressed? And these are only some of the rewards……

Keep in mind that you don’t have to start running marathons. Find an activity or exercise you are interested in and like; find the time to do it (there is always some time available) and go from there. Who knows…..you may eventually be in that marathon!

Posted 3 years, 3 months ago at 12:28 pm.

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The Impact of Daylight Saving Time

How are you feeling this week….even more tired than usual?  That may be due to Daylight Saving Time which occurred this past weekend. As we move the clocks forward, we lose an hour of that so very essential and precious sleep. On March 9 the Wall Street Journal published an article examining the side effects and repercussions of that lost hour (that loss has an even greater impact on shift workers!). To learn more, go to the Wall Street Journal……

 

Posted 3 years, 6 months ago at 11:39 am.

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Less Might Be More

Good news for shift workers! The Wall Street Journal is reporting that recent sleep studies have found that 7 hours is the optimal amount of sleep, not 8 as were recommended in the past. One study showed that cognitive performance increased as people got more sleep, reaching a peak at seven hours before starting to decline. Another found the lowest mortality and morbidity with 7 hours. Researchers are also reporting that too much sleep may be as harmful as too little sleep. The new sleep guidelines are expected to be issued in 2015.

Experts agree though that the optimal amount of sleep is what is right for each individual. Learn how you can determine what is right for you and learn more about the new sleep studies..

 

Posted 4 years, 2 months ago at 9:30 am.

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New Year’s Resolutions

Happy New Year! For many of us, this is often the time of year when, after having made New Year’s resolutions, we begin to slide and eventually, go back to our old undesirable ways. One proof of this is evident by gym statistics: memberships increase 12% in early January but most of those members stop going by March. Sixty-seven per cent of gym memberships are never used!

Why do we do this every year? We jump in with good intentions but do not seem able to sustain them; according to the University of Scranton Research, only 8% of people actually achieve their resolutions. A professor of neurology and the director of the UCLA Sleep Disorders Center, Dr. Alon Avidan, has an answer to that question and that answer is sleep or the lack of it. He says, “Improving sleep during the nighttime can really be very effective in improving quality of life in the daytime. Studies show that lack of sleep has an impact on weight gain and obesity, as well as memory, longevity and depression.

He suggests our primary New Year’s resolution should be getting more and better sleep; with our mind clearer and our body rested, our other resolutions will be more achievable.

Sleep, of course, is always in the forefront of shift worker’s minds. While getting enough quality sleep is difficult for day time workers, it is even harder for shift workers. A concerted effort has to be made to prepare a dark, quiet, tech-free environment for sleeping and then use it! By making sleep a priority, we can take the first step towards achieving our other goals.

Posted 4 years, 8 months ago at 11:40 am.

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Is There a Link between Sleep and Alzheimer’s Disease?

 

Last month we wrote about a new study that described how the brain cleans itself as we sleep by flushing out the toxins accumulated during our waking hours. We noted that the results of this study are of great interest to Alzheimer’s researchers because one of the byproducts that is cleaned out daily is beta-amyloid, clumps of which form plaques found in the brains of AD (Alzheimers Disease) patients.

Sleep patterns have previously been linked to beta-amyloid plaques. Researchers from The John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Health have observed that those with AD spend more time awake and have more fragmented sleep patterns than those without the disease. They wanted to determine whether there was a link between beta-amyloid deposits and sleep within community-dwelling older adults.

The test group for their study consisted of 70 adults with an average age of 76; none of the participants had any form of dementia. They were asked to record their sleep patterns which included the duration of sleep and any trouble falling or staying asleep. Various brain imaging techniques were used to measure the beta-amyloid deposition in their brains.

The researchers report that the results of this study were consistent with those from animal research in which sleep deprivation increased interstitial fluid beta-amyloid levels. They note that this could have a tremendous impact on public health as AD is the most common form of dementia and almost half of older adults with the disorder report insomnia based symptoms. They say that “because late-life sleep disturbance can be treated, interventions to improve sleep or maintain healthy sleep among older adults may help prevent or slow AD to the extent that poor sleep promotes AD onset and progression.

The emotional, financial and logistical costs of AD are significant and will only increase as our population ages and more people are diagnosed. Further testing and research regarding sleep and its connection to AD continue to be conducted. The Cure Alzheimer’s Fund of Wellesley Hills, MA, dedicated to ending Alzheimer’s Disease, is currently funding a proposal on this subject.

Posted 4 years, 10 months ago at 2:46 pm.

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Sleep Cleans Our Brains!

Sleep, that often elusive (especially for shift workers) yet essential part of all of our lives, is in the news again because of a new study published in the journal Science last week.

Scientists at the University of Rochester have discovered that sleep, in addition to boosting learning and memory retention and helping us feel more rested and alert, also gives our brains the opportunity to˜take out the trash”.  The trash is the toxic byproducts of activity during the daytime that need to be flushed out. The brain’s cleaning system goes into high gear when we are asleep by shrinking the cells in the brain allowing the cerebrospinal fluid to circulate throughout the brain tissue collecting the waste and sending it into the bloodstream. From there it is carried to the liver for detoxification.

Dr. Charles Czeisler, chief of the division of sleep medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, commented that the brain acts like a smart sanitation engineer; it’s easier to move the trash at night when the streets are clear. When we don’t get enough sleep or stay up all night, the toxins aren’t removed as efficiently as when we are sleeping. This explains why sleep deprivation has such strong and immediate consequences, such as mental fog and crankiness.

The results of this study are of great interest to Alzheimer’s researchers because one of the byproducts that is cleaned out daily is beta-amyloid, clumps of which form plaques found in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients.

If we didn’t already have enough reasons for trying to get enough sleep, this can certainly be added to our list!

Posted 4 years, 11 months ago at 11:34 am.

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What is Enough Sleep?

Sleep is an often discussed subject, as most of us say and think we do not get enough. But what is enough and what does happens when we are sleep deprived? A recent New York Times article reports these were some of the questions being looked at by the Hospital of Pennsylvania’s Sleep & Chronobiology Laboratory when conducting the longest sleep restriction study of its kind.

For two weeks, dozens of subjects were assigned to one of 3 groups with each group sleeping for a designated number of hours. Not surprisingly, those subjects who slept 8 hours a day hardly had any attention lapses and no cognitive decline over the course of 14 days. However, those who slept less had significantly different experiences and outcomes. Read this article….

Posted 7 years, 5 months ago at 3:17 pm.

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